United States lifts laptop ban on Emirates flights

0
1079

The Emirates airline has said the cabin ban on laptops no longer applies on its flights to the United States.

In March, the US banned cabin laptops and other large electronic devices to and from eight mostly Muslim nations, fearing bombs may be concealed in them.

An Emirates spokeswoman said it had worked with US authorities to meet the requirements of the new security guidelines for all US bound flights.

Emirates, the Middle East’s largest airline, flies to 12 US cities.

It comes after the US lifted the laptop ban on Sunday for Etihad flights from Abu Dhabi to the US.

The boss of Turkish Airlines has said he expects the ban to be lifted for his airline soon as well.

Under the US rules, devices “larger than a smartphone” were not allowed in the cabins of flights from Turkey, Morocco, Jordan, Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait.

The US Homeland Security department unveiled further measures last week to enhance security on flights entering the country.

The new measures require enhanced screening, more thorough vetting of passengers and the wider use of bomb-sniffer dogs in 105 countries.

Meanwhile, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) has welcomed the decision by the United States Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to require enhanced security measures as an alternative to restrictions on the carriage of large portable electronic devices in the cabin on all flights to the US.

This includes the ability to remove the existing restrictions on certain flights departing from the Middle East and North Africa to the US.

IATA’s director general and chief executive officer, Alexandre de Juniac, who made the commendation in a press statement, said the association “looks forward to working with our member airlines and DHS to implement this phased approach to enhanced aviation security, including ensuring that airline costs and operational impacts are minimized.”

“Keeping our passengers and crew safe and secure is our top priority. This creates a natural partnership with governments, which have the primary responsibility for security. Today’s actions raise the bar on security.

The aggressive implementation timeline will, however, be challenging. Meeting it will require a continued team effort of government and industry stakeholders. In particular, airlines and airports will need to be supported by host states during the phase-in of the new requirements,” he said.

BBC, IATA

 

 

 

 

 

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here